Gardeners World episode 29 2017

Monty plans for next year’s fruit harvest when he adds gooseberries to the fruit garden he planted earlier in the year.

Monty plans for next year’s fruit harvest when he adds gooseberries to the fruit garden he planted earlier in the year. He also divides and moves herbaceous perennials and advises on the best bulbs to plant now for cut flowers next year.


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Frances Tophill meets a couple who have filled their garden with tender plants and devised a meticulous method of protecting them over the winter, and we catch up with Adam Frost in his own garden when he gives design tips on placing and planting trees. Nick Bailey explores a myriad of colour in leaf, bark and berry when he travels to Bluebell Arboretum in Leicestershire.


Arit Anderson is in Yorkshire, where she finds out about a project using innovative techniques for producing food. We also visit Warwickshire to look at their collection of hardy chrysanthemums and to see how they can bring much-needed late colour into our gardens.

In Gardeners World episode 29 2017:

 1. Trees and shrubs planting

Planting new trees and shrubs is not a difficult job, but one to get right, if you want your new plants to have the best start in life. The most important considerations are root health, weather, soil conditions and aftercare.

 2. Chrysanthemums care

This florist’s favourite offers striking colours and various habits. It makes a welcome late summer and autumn show in borders and beds, with the added benefit of providing perfect cutting material for floral arrangements.

 3. Planting gooseberries

Gooseberries are an easy-to-grow soft fruit and they can thrive in many kinds of soil, although they really like a sunny site. They can be grown as bushes or be trained against a wall to take up less space in a small garden – you can even grow gooseberries in containers.

 4. Growing winter salads

Sow in August and they can provide leaves for salads and stir-fries right through autumn. They flourish best in the cooler shortening days – don’t be put off if you have tried them earlier in the year with little success.

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