Gardeners World episode 10 2015

Joe Swift goes on a quest to find out more about the wonderful world of hanging baskets, starting with a visit to one of the country’s leading growers.

As Monty’s wildlife garden begins to take shape at Longmeadow, bees are very much at the forefront of his mind. He plants up a nectar-rich border that will attract all sorts of bees and other pollinating insects from spring right through to the autumn.


Meanwhile, Joe Swift goes on a quest to find out more about the wonderful world of hanging baskets, starting with a visit to one of the country’s leading growers.

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In Gardeners World episode 10 2015:

1. Deadhead & re-pot spent tulips

If your tulips have gone over and you need the pots for something else, empty them out and either heel them in the ground or re-pot them. Remove the dead heads and give them a liquid tomato feed so that as the foliage dies down, the bulb stores lots of energy for next year’s display.

 2. Plant out sweet peas

Once you have hardened off your sweet peas, now is the time to plant them out. Ensure they have something to climb up and, although they have tendrils, they may need to be tied in with some string to start with. Water in well and keep them watered through the season to ensure a wonderful display.

 3. Harden off outdoor tomatoes

If you are growing outdoor tomatoes, now is the time to harden them off. Place them in a cold frame or sheltered part of your garden for at least a week before planting them out in their final position. If you are growing a cordon variety, look out for any side-shoots and nip them out.

 4. Hanging baskets

Whether planted for summer or winter interest, hanging baskets provide valuable colour at eye level. Choose vibrant bedding plants for a short-term show or herbs, shrubs and evergreens for a long-lasting display.

 5. Bluebells

Hyacinthoides are bulbous perennials with linear to strap-shaped leaves and bell-shaped or star-shaped blue, violet or white flowers in spring

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