Gardeners World episode 15 2016

Monty Don is reaping the rewards of the summer when he begins to harvest crops from the vegetable garden and gives tips on extending the flower season in the borders.

Monty Don is reaping the rewards of the summer when he begins to harvest crops from the vegetable garden and gives tips on extending the flower season in the borders.


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Carol takes a trip to the seaside to discover why some plants thrive despite being assaulted by salt-laden winds and we make a final visit to Sissinghurst to catch up with Troy Scott-Smith and see the changes that have been made to the garden.


In Gardeners World episode 15 2016:

 1. How to stake perennials

Perennials in borders often put on strong lush growth that makes them vulnerable to collapse, especially after heavy rain or strong winds. Staking them early in the season will help avoid disaster. In particular; tall plants and hybrids with large flowers require additional support.

 2. How to thin fruit

In favourable conditions fruit trees set more fruit than is ideal. Fruit thinning involves removing excess fruit to improve fruit size and quality. It is carried out on apples, pears, plums, peaches and nectarines.

 3. Deadheading plants

Deadheading is the term used for the removal of flowers from plants when they are fading or dead. It is done to keep plants looking attractive and encourage more blooms, whether in beds and border, containers or hanging baskets.

 4. Tips on growing fuchsias

Fuchsias are grown for their very attractive, usually pendent flowers that are borne more or less continuously from summer to autumn. They are useful in summer-bedding schemes, containers or in the ground. Some fuchsias are hardy enough to be used as hedges and in permanent plantings.

 5. How to grow great raspberries

Raspberries are really popular garden fruits and are very easy to grow. Try growing both summer and autumn-fruiting varieties: just a few plants will reward you with plenty of fruit from midsummer until mid autumn. If you end up with a glut, raspberries also freeze well, and make wonderful jams, sauces and cooked desserts.

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