The Beechgrove Garden episode 4 2016

In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is attempting to turn yellow into green as he tackles the lawn, which has turned a washed-out yellow after all the rains of winter.

In the Beechgrove Garden, Jim is attempting to turn yellow into green as he tackles the lawn, which has turned a washed-out yellow after all the rains of winter. And continuing the theme of upgrading the 20-year-old Beechgrove Garden, Jim takes on an unloved corner of the low-maintenance garden, removing a rotting fence and pruning a wayward quince.


 

Brian Cunningham visits the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh, which is home to one of the most impressive alpine collections in the world, for inspiration as to how to recreate that in miniature back in Beechgrove.

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In Beechgrove Garden episode 4 2016:

 1. Spring Bedding

The wet winter weather that we have had at Beechgrove has definitely affected the spring bedding display in the trials plot. Things like the Violas and pansies used as ground cover have suffered although in the planters they were doing better because they were slightly better protected. The smaller daffodils were looking stunning however. Carole liked the variety ‘Rip Van Winkle’ – Jim was not so keen. The cyclaminieus varieties ‘Warbler’ and ‘Tracey’ were looking good.


 2. Driveway Garden

After 20 years at the present garden some of the boundaries between gardens are a bit worse for wear. The fence between the Low Maintenance Garden and the Driveway Garden was showing its age and was starting to fall apart so Jim aided by Callum set out to remedy that. However the first consideration was the plants.
A beautiful quince was about to flower (a gorgeous pink colour) and had to be tied back and supported before work could begin on the fence.

 3. Pond Bank Structure Planting

20 years ago there was no water at all at Beechgrove and the site was a former tree nursery. When the garden was created the ornamental part of the garden was centred around an ambitious water feature. The feature starts with a top pool that is meant to represent a spring at the top of a Scottish hillside surrounded by
heaths and heathers. The burn then ambles its way under the bridge and through an 80 foot series of splash pools. The burn reflects the colourful herbaceous area
and shrub border along the way.

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