The Beechgrove Garden episode 11 2018 – Fruit cage mini orchard

In Beechgrove Garden episode 11 2018 – Jim and Carole have butter and cream on standby in the hopes that there might be some early potatoes and strawberries ready to harvest. Meanwhile, Chris takes on a shady location by the pond at Beechgrove to create a new large shrub and clematis border.


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George visits the unique Japanese garden at Cowden Castle, Clackmannanshire. Dating back to the early 20th century, it was the first oriental garden of its size and remains a beautiful horticultural bridge between Scottish and Japanese culture.

Beechgrove Garden episode 11 2018:

 

Fruit cage mini orchard

Three years ago George established a mini fruit orchard of apples on a range of different root stocks which control the vigour of the plants. What this means for the gardeners is that fruit can be grown in a more compact space than if the plants were grown on their own vigorous roots. M27 is the most dwarfing variety that we have at Beechgrove – and this produces a tree no taller than 5 – 6 feet and therefore means that all of the fruit can be easily picked.

Shady sloping bank planting

We set Chris a really awkward planting job this week on a steeply sloping bank next to the pond. Awkward primarily because there is a significant amount of shade up at the top of the bank, but at the bottom of the bank there is full sun till at least mid-day. What he wanted was a naturalistic informal shrub planting area. Before planting Chris investigated what the soil conditions were, by digging a trial soil pit.

Greenhouse

In her 6×8 greenhouse, Carole has been creating a colourful display, with red or ruby as the main colour to celebrate our ruby anniversary. She was watering the
new collection of Asiatic lilies planted in a succession to give us successional flowering.The variety ‘Red Power’ is budding up nicely and to make sure there are lots of flowers, water regularly and fertilise with a product high in Potassium,i.e. a tomato fertiliser.

The Amaryllis had virtually finished flowering, so the advice now was to give them good light and cut back the flowering spikes, and every 10 –14 days give a feed with a high Potassium feed to encourage next years flowers. Carole has added some new plants to this display this year. Calceolaria ‘Kentish Hero’ (the slipperf lower) is a tender perennial and new to Carole, this variety is very striking with its orange/red oddly shaped flowers. We will take cuttings of this plant for next year.

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The Beechgrove Garden episode 11 2018 - Fruit cage mini orchard
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In Beechgrove Garden episode 11 2018 - Jim and Carole have butter and cream on standby in the hopes that there might be some early potatoes and strawberries ready to harvest.

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